Amarillo Genealogical Society
 
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How to tell the difference between a Real Photo Postcard and a printed Postcard There is some confusion on what Real Photo Postcards (RPPC) are, and how to differentiate from a printed postcard. Real Photo Postcards are photographs that are reproduced by actually developing them onto photographic paper the size and weight of Postcards, with a Postcard back. There are many Postcards that reproduce photos by various printing methods that are NOT "real photos"...the same methods used when reproducing photos in magazines and newspapers. The best way to tell the difference is to look at the Postcard with a magnifying glass. If the photo is printed, you will see that it is made up of a lot of little dots, the same as a photo printed in a newspaper. A Real Photo Postcard is solid, no dots.
Last Updated: 11 September 2020
Post Card History and Dating Methods Although the world's first picture post cards date from the 1860s to the mid-1870s, post cards, as we know them, came into being in the United States about 1901. Prior to that time, there were trade cards and postal cards, which usually carried advertising or printed messages. Trade cards became popular with the enterprising merchants who distributed them from the 1870s to the 1890s. With the advent of the camera, which was developed in the mid-1800s, and later the post card, history would be forever immortalized in print. The back of a post card can give several clues about the age of a card. If the postmark on a postally used card is readable, that is the first clue to its age. Most of the cards that made it to the post office were mailed within a year or two of being produced. On a card that was not mailed, the first place to look is the stamp box.
Last Updated: 11 September 2020